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  • 19 Dec 2014 12:49 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)
    Galloway Township, NJ - The Wetlands Institute of Stone Harbor, NJ and The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey today agreed to collaborate on a wide variety of educational and research programs using the facilities of both institutions, in a memorandum of agreement (MOA) signed at a meeting of the Stockton Board of Trustees.

    Stockton and The Wetlands Institute share a strong interest in coastal and environmental issues and each promotes public education in marine and environmental science and ecological stewardship.

    The two institutions will work together to expand undergraduate and graduate degree programs and professional training courses, seminars, student teaching opportunities and internships.

    “This collaboration is designed to meet the increasing regional, state and national needs for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education and to strengthen the regional economy,” said Stockton President Herman Saatkamp. “STEM is critical to the United States’ efforts to preserve Earth’s environment and to compete in a global economy.

    “Stockton and The Wetlands Institute will work together to expand the economic base of southern New Jersey through educating more future scientists, researchers and educators,” President Saatkamp said. Industry projections indicate there will be 269,000 jobs in New Jersey alone for science majors by 2019.

    The Wetlands Institute, located on 6,000 acres in Cape May County, includes a center and an aquarium, an elevated marsh walkway, two research boats and docks, and a dormitory to house eight students or visiting scientists.

    The institute will provide sites where Stockton classes can meet and Stockton will open its facilities to Wetlands Institute programs, such as at the Carnegie Center in Atlantic City, the Nacote Creek Field Marine Science and Environmental Field Station in Port Republic, NJ and other locations.

    Marine Science and Environmental Science are two of the flagship programs in the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics (NAMS, which awards more than 22 percent of the bachelor’s degrees in science and math among New Jersey’s public colleges and universities. On campus, NAMS facilities include in the 66,350-square-foot Unified Science Center, which opened in September 2013. A 59,843-square-foot expansion, to be called Unified Science Center 2, will open in 2017.

    "The Wetlands Institute has a long history of research, conservation, and education in coastal and wetland ecosystems and we are pleased to enter into this agreement with Stockton College to provide additional opportunities for collaboration among our staff and faculty, staff and students at the college,” said Dr. Lenore Tedesco, executive director of The Wetlands Institute. “This is a win for the State of New Jersey."

    The Wetlands Institute has more than 1,500 members, over 200 volunteers and receives over 20,000 visitors annually, including 6,000 school-aged children. Its Education Department focuses on hands-on experiences, including community events that reach 1,500 people annually, 350 children attending summer nature programs, and more than 1,800 students in boat-based marine education programs.

    The Wetlands Institute has long been known for its research and conservation efforts with the diamondback terrapin, through its Education, Research and Conservation Departments. Stockton will continue to support such conservation, including incubating recovered eggs and rearing hatchlings, as well as caring for injured terrapins.

    The Wetlands Institute is also expanding its work to include avian ecology, specifically coastal birds, along with fisheries science and conservation and wetlands ecology.

    The two institutions will also explore jointly seeking grants from federal and state agencies as well as private foundations.

    In other business, the board of trustees approved an all-inclusive tuition/fee rate of $650 per credit for online master’s degree programs and online graduate educational endorsements and graduate certificate programs, beginning in Spring 2015. Online programs reduce the overhead costs of physical facilities, so Stockton is reducing the cost to students in those fully online programs.

    In-state graduate students would save over $92 per credit in tuition with the fully online master’s and other included programs; out-of-state students would save over $399 in tuition per credit on such programs. Students in these programs would save an additional $80 as the college is waiving its transportation fee.


  • 18 Dec 2014 3:08 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)
    The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) recently co-hosted a successful first-of-its-kind Resilience Finance Symposium in New Jersey, attended by about 120 participants from a wide spectrum of public and private entities in the state, region, and country.

    Held on November 12 with Governor Christie’s Administration and the New Jersey Institute of Technology’s College of Architecture + Design, the all-day Resilience Finance Symposium: Building Resilient and Sustainable Energy Solutions for New Jersey’s Key Infrastructure featured a series of panels on solutions that help keep the lights and heat on during critical times, like microgrids and energy storage, as well as innovative ways of financing resilient energy systems.

    A main topic of discussion was the impressive progress New Jersey has made toward making the state’s energy infrastructure more resilient in the two years since Superstorm Sandy caused a massive weeks-long power outage. Panelists pointed to Sandy success stories – those instances when power stayed on even when the grid went down – and discussed the need to make these kinds of successes the norm rather than the exception.

    One shining example was Princeton University’s microgrid, which was able to ‘island’ itself from the main grid and provide much-needed power to 12,000 people. Princeton University Energy Plant Manager, Ted Borer, was on hand to explain how the microgrid, fueled by a gas-turbine generator and solar power, was an effective low-carbon solution that can be replicated across the state.

    Full story can be found at the link below:

    http://blogs.edf.org/energyexchange/2014/11/17/two-years-after-sandy-the-conversation-around-energy-resiliency-still-going-strong/


  • 18 Dec 2014 3:06 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)
    Theological seminaries – where religious leaders are trained - should educate leaders to meet the environmental crises we face.

    This belief is at the heart of the Green Seminary Initiative, a network which has worked with more than 50 seminaries, divinity schools and schools of theology to address caring for creation through academic, spiritual, and practical steps.

    Now, GreenFaith and Drew Theological School have announced that the Green Seminary Initiative is becoming a joint program of both institutions. "Environmental interest in theological schools is at an all-time high," said Dr. Laurel Kearns of Drew Theological School, a GSI co-founder and long-time seminary environmental leader. “Through this partnership, GSI aims to help these schools reach our considerable potential as leaders for creation.”

    On its website, the Green Seminary Initiative maintains an extensive array of resources for seminary faculty and leaders, including a collection of sample curricula and guidelines and profiles of these schools’ environmental efforts. “Seminaries around the world are seeking to integrate care for the earth into the core of their identity,” said the Rev. Dr. Javier Vera, Dean at Drew Theological School, based in New Jersey. “GSI represents a critically important initiative.”

    The first project for this new initiative is the development of an environmental certification program for seminaries. Modeled on GreenFaith’s Certification Program for congregations and utilizing GSI’s experience and network of relationships, this program will offer specific standards and guidance to seminaries to launch or further their efforts to protect the earth and to prepare their students for environmental leadership.

    “More than any other group of institutions, these schools influence the future of the faith community,” said GreenFaith’s Fletcher Harper. “The Green Seminary Initiative will shape generations of religiously-inspired environmental leaders who can make an enormous impact.”

    About the Green Seminary Initiative
    The Green Seminary Initiative was launched in 2007 when six leading eco-theologians - John Cobb, Cal Dewitt, Norman Habel, Sallie McFague, Larry Rasmussen and Rosemary Reuther – called on theological schools to prepare religious leaders to meet the ecological crisis. Building on the work of Theological Education to Meet the Ecological Challenge (TEMEC), GSI was originally housed at Lutheran School of Theology Chicago, where co-founder David Rhoades taught, and moved to Drew in 2010 upon his retirement. GSI has held joint programs with GreenFaith and Drew for over five years.
    To learn about the Green Seminary Initiative, see the link below:

    http://www.greenseminaries.org


  • 13 Nov 2014 11:36 AM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)

    FROM THE DESK OF SHANA WEBER

    Dear members of the NJ higher education sustainability community, 

    As the new President of NJHEPS, I am honored to welcome you to the start of a new academic year and continued momentum for our collective efforts across New Jersey. I welcome each of you to join us in accelerating the impact our campuses have on shifting attitudes and behaviors through education and research, and strengthening our New Jersey networks and partnerships. I look forward to seeing you at our upcoming events, lectures, and workshops. 

                                                         -----------------------


    NJHEPS & EcoMotion OFFER FREE CAMPUS SOLAR ASSESSMENT

    We are delighted to report that in partnership with NJHEPS, our friends at EcoMotion, Inc. are extending to our member schools an initial campus solar assessment at no cost!

    While EcoMotion offers a range of sustainability services, they have gained a strong reputation with their unique brand of “honest broker” consulting for potential solar projects and have a proven track record of helping schools navigate the solar terrain and maximize the value of installing solar on or off campus.

    As EcoMotion’s President, Ted Flanigan, explains,

    Schools want to get the most solar for their dollar, but the goal of solar developers is to squeeze maximum profit out of an institution. As a school’s representative, we step in to negotiate that disconnect by helping institutions navigate key decisions about solar: IF, WHERE, HOW MUCH, WHEN and with WHOM. It’s never too late to get advice. One organization that had already bid their project saved a quarter million dollars by rebidding it with our assistance.

    The services we offer schools solar buyers include project planning, on-site analysis, financial analysis, project proposal preparation for competitive bidding, contractor selection, project management, public relations, inspections and ongoing system monitoring.”

    What will you receive with free solar consultation?

    • Initial rooftop assessment from experienced experts
    • Up to 12 hours of no-cost consultation with EcoMotion’s Solar Advisors
    • Key recommendations for maximizing project
    • Understanding various incentives and utility programs that govern solar use in New Jersey

    Learn more by visiting www.ecomotion.us/campuses/

    If you have questions about implementing a solar project, we encourage you to reach out to EcoMotion’s Solar Advisors by calling (949) 450-7153. Be sure to inform them that your campus is a member of NJHEPS!

                                                       -----------------------


    Richard Stockton and Burlington County Colleges Form Dual-Credit Sustainability Course Partnerships with NJ High Schools

    In the past year The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (Stockton) and Burlington County College (BCC) have worked cooperatively to form dual-credit agreements with technical high schools across the state in the area of sustainability education. Under these agreements, students who enroll in approved dual-credit courses at their high school will have the opportunity to earn college credits for Stockton’s and BCC’s introductory sustainability courses.

    Stockton’s Assistant Professor of Sustainability and Program Coordinator Patrick Hossay is providing professional training to high school teachers who want to learn how to implement introductory sustainability courses in their schools. The training sessions are held in Trenton at the New Jersey School Boards Association. During the 2013-2014 academic year, teachers from an initial group of 11 schools participated in four training sessions with the intent to establish new sustainability courses in most of these schools this fall:

    · Atlantic County Institute of Technology
    · Bergen County Technical School
    · Bergenfield High School
    · Camden County Technical High School
    · Cape May Technical High School
    · Cedar Creek High School
    · Essex County Vocational Technical Schools
    · Hunterdon County Polytech
    · Middlesex County Vocational & Technical Schools
    · Salem County Vocational Technical Schools
    · Union County Vocational Technical Schools

    Three sessions were also held in August and included teachers and administrators from additional interested schools. Sessions will continue throughout the year for teachers in the process of teaching or who are interested in teaching a sustainability course in the future.

    Students at participating high schools will be able to enroll with a head-start in sustainability-related degree programs at Stockton (Bachelor of Arts or Science in sustainability) or at BCC (Associate degree in sustainability, energy management or alternative energy). Also, students completing an associate degree at BCC with a 3.0 or higher GPA may transfer to Stockton’s sustainability degree program with junior status under a previously established articulation agreement.

    Several of the 11 schools are also participating in the New Jersey Green Program of Study (NJGPOS), a five-year pilot program in the state Department of Education (DOE) to develop three sustainable career pathways in energy, construction and design for Career & Technical Education and Comprehensive High Schools. The NJGPOS is currently being managed by the School Boards Association in collaboration with the DOE. For more information about the NJGPOS contact John Henry, program director, jhenry@njsba.org. For information about the training sessions, contact Marianne Leone, NJ Green Program of Study Coordinator, NJGPOS@NJSBA.org or 609-315-6218.

    For dual-credit information, contact: Stockton – Patrick Hossay, Patrick.Hossay@stockton.edu, 609-652-4303; BCC – Bob Brzozowski, Academic Coordinator of the Center for Sustainability & Alternative Energy, rbrzozowski@bcc.edu, 609-894-9311, ext. 1941.

  • 14 Oct 2014 12:29 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)
    The NJHEPS Sustainability Education Conference held on Monday, Oct 13 at Ramapo College was a great success, as featured speaker Debra Rowe, NJHEPS President Shana Weber and conference attendees go together and discussed the exciting new opportunities and challenges ahead for those committed to sustainability on our college and university campuses and beyond.


    Click here for a Photo Gallery from the Event







  • 14 Sep 2014 3:19 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)

    Message from Dr. Jeffrey Sachs, of Columbia University and the Earth Institute

     

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    The Sustainable Development Solutions Network is proud to present its new education initiative, SDSN.edu, which brings together online courses on sustainable development created by experts from around the world!  We are rolling out several exciting courses throughout the Fall. Please join us in spreading the word!
     
    We are kicking off SDSN.edu with three courses:

    1.       I am offering my course The Age of Sustainable Development again, starting September 9, 2014. There will also be a special bonus this Fall: all students that complete the course will receive the free e-book version of my new book, titled The Age of Sustainable Development.

    2.       The two-semester course Climate Change Science & Negotiationstaught by myself and Emmanuel Guerin, will introduce the science and policies of climate change. The course includes a simulated UNFCCC negotiation during the second semester, in which students take on the role of country delegates. This course coincides with the broader SDSN Climate Change Call to Action

    3.       Planetary Boundaries and Human Opportunities, by Prof. Johan Rockström and his colleagues at the Stockholm Resilience Center, offers an outstanding overview of sustainability science and potential pathways for human well-being. 

    All three SDSN.edu courses are free of charge and are now open for enrollment. OtherSDSN.edu courses are currently in development and will be announced soon. 

    The coming year and a half, till the end of 2015, will be a pivotal period in the history of sustainable development. Please join SDSN.edu in mobilizing education for sustainable development by spreading the word among your friends and colleagues. If you have questions please write to our Education Initiatives team at edu@unsdsn.org.

     

     
    Kind regards,

    Jeffrey D. Sachs




  • 22 Jul 2014 5:09 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)
    Shana Weber has been appointed president of the New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability (NJHEPS) effective July 1
     
    NJHEPS is committed to advancing sustainability across the New Jersey higher education community through cross-sector partnerships, teaching, research, outreach, operations and community life.
     
    "I am honored to join the leadership team at NJHEPS and look forward to working with our many partners across the state," said Weber, who is the director of the Office of Sustainability at Princeton University. 
     
    "Students, staff, faculty and facilities personnel on campuses across New Jersey are dedicated innovators and together we can be a positive force for accelerated action in partnership with government, environmental, community and business leaders," Weber said. "I am confident that NJHEPS can make a difference in the Garden State and be an example for the nation at large."
     
    “I'm confident that Shana's leadership will continue to bridge the gap between institutions, disciplines and communities, not only to move the bar on sustainability but to make sustainability part of every day life for its citizens," said Michael Kornitas, former NJHEPS president and director of Sustainability and Energy at Rutgers University. 
     
    Weber received her bachelor's degree in Zoology from Ohio State University and doctorate in environmental science from Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs. She currently serves on the board of trustees for Sustainable Princeton, the municipal nonprofit organization. She is a member of the Ivy-plus Sustainability Consortium, and executive host of the Northeast Campus Sustainability Consortium. 
     
    Weber's current research activities include collaborative applied research among higher education sustainability offices, and climate-change driven population dynamics of the American pika across the American West.


  • 30 Jun 2014 4:19 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)

    STUDENT AWARDS

    During Spring 2014, NJHEPS launched its first annual Student Research Paper/Project in Sustainability Contest. This award is to honor the best undergraduate research paper or project from college/university students enrolled at NJEHPS member institutions.

    In highlighting the efforts of these students, we promote the critical idea of sustainability and contribute to the education and motivation of our students. The first annual NJEHPS Student Research Paper/Project in Sustainability winners were announced at the NJHEPS Annual Governing Board Meeting during the luncheon which featured a public talk by actor/environmentalist Ed Begley, Jr.

    This year’s winners were:  1st place co-winners Lauren Edelman of Princeton University and Bryan Rubio of Kean University ; 2nd place co-winners Yifan Li of Princeton University and Joseph Roddy of Kean University; Chris Koscica and Michelle Hompesch, both of Montclair State University. The student winners receive monetary awards from NJHEPS to recognize their excellent works.

    “We were very proud to honor these exceptional students, who will make such a difference in the world with their vision and dedication," said Shana Weber, NHEPS President. During the Award Luncheon, world-renowned environmental activist and award-winning actor Ed Begley, Jr. addressed the honored students.  "I was also very touched by the kind and encouraging words that Ed Begley, Jr. had for these young leaders,” said Weber.


    RVCC RECEIVES CAMPUS AWARD

    June 23, 2014 -- The New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability (NJHEPS) has selected Raritan Valley Community College (RVCC) as the first recipient of the NJHEPS Excellence in Campus Sustainability Award.

    NJHEPS, a not-for-profit organization committed to advancing sustainability statewide through partnerships with and among higher education institutions, recognized Raritan Valley Community College for sustainability excellence in its new Bateman Student Center and its extensive 2014 Earth Week Initiative.

    Unveiled in February 2014, the Ray Bateman Center for Student Life and Leadership Building features a 9’ by 15’  “living wall” of vegetation designed to improve the indoor environment. The living wall is a vertical, hydroponic planting system that contains about 600 individual tropical. The wall absorbs noise, filters air, and provides a natural, relaxing setting for the students.  The wall was designed and installed by Kelly Mac Interiorscapes, a small local business based in Pittstown. The installation cost of approximately $21,000 was funded by a grant from the Merck Foundation.

    Additionally, RVCC’s 2014 Earth Week Initiative, organized by the Sustainability Committee and the Student Environmental Club and funded by a College Community Fund Grant, featured innovator Mike Strizki of the Hydrogen House Project as its keynote speaker. The campus-wide Initiative also included a zero landfill waste event with Economics Professor Dan Aronson.

    Promotions for the event were produced by design student Atulya Chaganty as part of a class assignment, as well as collaboratively among various campus offices and committees, resulting in widespread on-campus communications as well as local media coverage.

    With its Bateman Center for Student Life and its comprehensive 2014 Earth Week Initiative, Raritan Valley Community College has demonstrated meaningful leadership in the field of Sustainability.  The NJHEPS is pleased to honor it for these efforts.

    “Achieving sustainability is all about collective impact, but each campus can shine as it brings its particular strengths to the effort. Raritan Valley Community College really impressed us with how thoughtfully they implemented two key programs this past year – from building systems to behavior change and communications," said Shana Weber, NJHEPS President. "They are demonstrating the kind of complex multi-dimensional thinking that the sustainability endeavor requires, and as a result are in a strong position to pass that skill on to their students. That’s really what it’s all about and we are grateful for their leadership.”



  • 23 Jun 2014 3:32 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)

    June 23, 2014 -- The New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability (NJHEPS) has selected Raritan Valley Community College (RVCC) as the first recipient of the NJHEPS Excellence in Campus Sustainability Award.

    NJHEPS, a not-for-profit organization committed to advancing sustainability statewide through partnerships with and among higher education institutions, recognized Raritan Valley Community College for sustainability excellence in its new Bateman Student Center and its extensive 2014 Earth Week Initiative.

    Unveiled in February 2014, the Ray Bateman Center for Student Life and Leadership Building features a 9’ by 15’  “living wall” of vegetation designed to improve the indoor environment. The living wall is a vertical, hydroponic planting system that contains about 600 individual tropical. The wall absorbs noise, filters air, and provides a natural, relaxing setting for the students.  The wall was designed and installed by Kelly Mac Interiorscapes, a small local business based in Pittstown. The installation cost of approximately $21,000 was funded by a grant from the Merck Foundation.

    Additionally, RVCC’s 2014 Earth Week Initiative, organized by the Sustainability Committee and the Student Environmental Club and funded by a College Community Fund Grant, featured innovator Mike Strizki of the Hydrogen House Project as its keynote speaker. The campus-wide Initiative also included a zero landfill waste event with Economics Professor Dan Aronson.

    Promotions for the event were produced by design student Atulya Chaganty as part of a class assignment, as well as collaboratively among various campus offices and committees, resulting in widespread on-campus communications as well as local media coverage.

    With its Bateman Center for Student Life and its comprehensive 2014 Earth Week Initiative, Raritan Valley Community College has demonstrated meaningful leadership in the field of Sustainability.  The NJHEPS is pleased to honor it for these efforts.

    “Achieving sustainability is all about collective impact, but each campus can shine as it brings its particular strengths to the effort. Raritan Valley Community College really impressed us with how thoughtfully they implemented two key programs this past year – from building systems to behavior change and communications," said Shana Weber, NJHEPS President. "They are demonstrating the kind of complex multi-dimensional thinking that the sustainability endeavor requires, and as a result are in a strong position to pass that skill on to their students. That’s really what it’s all about and we are grateful for their leadership.”

  • 08 Mar 2014 3:19 PM | Kristie Reilly (Administrator)

    In his critically acclaimed book and TED talk of the same title, Simon Sinek argued, “people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”  He offered his observation in the context of what he describes as The Golden Circle, three concentric circles labeled WHY, HOW, and WHAT.  He emphasized, “when most organizations or people think, act or communicate they do so from the outside in, from WHAT to WHY.  And for good reason -- they go from clearest thing to the fuzziest thing.  We say WHAT we do, we sometimes say HOW we do it, but we rarely say WHY we do WHAT we do.”  He defined WHY as the “purpose, cause or belief” of an organization.  He clarified, “WHY does not come from looking ahead at what you want to achieve and figuring out an appropriate strategy to get there….It comes from looking in the completely opposite direction from where you are now.  Finding WHY is a process of discovery, not invention.”  He proposed, “inspired” organizations “communicate from the inside out.”  The idea is that by articulating WHY an organization does what it does, HOW it does it is easier to identify.  WHAT is the result that quantifies if it is successful in achieving its WHY.

    More illuminating is his observation, “when an organization defines itself by WHAT it does, that’s all it will ever be able to do.”  Organizations “with a clear sense of WHY,” he argued, “don’t have to “convince” anyone of their value.”  To be authentic, according to Sinek, an organization, viz its members, must abide by a simple rule: “everything you say and everything you do you actually believe.”

    So, what does this have to do with the NJHEPS you might be wondering?  I believe it strikes at the core of the partnership. Let’s examine two different models of communicating about the NJHEPS based on Sinek’s observations that illustrate my belief. 

    Model 1:

    We seek to transform the New Jersey higher education community to practice sustainability consistently and to contribute to the state’s, region’s, and world’s emerging understanding of sustainability through teaching, research, outreach, operations, and community life. (WHAT) (Current mission statement.)

    We are an organization comprised of 16 junior colleges, 16 independent four-year colleges/universities, 2 public research universities, 9 state college/universities, and 4 Rabbinical/Theological Seminaries. (HOW – but weak)

    Want to become a member?  Want to join us in our mission?

    Model 2:

    We believe, “Higher education institutions bear a profound moral responsibility to increase the awareness, knowledge, skills and values needed to create a just and sustainable future.” (WHY)

    To achieve this moral responsibility, we’ve formed a partnership organization currently comprised of 16 junior colleges, 16 independent four-year colleges/universities, 2 public research universities, 9 state college/universities, and 4 Rabbinical/Theological Seminaries. (HOW)

    Our mission is to transform the New Jersey higher education community to practice sustainability consistently and to contribute to the state’s, region’s, and world’s emerging understanding of sustainability through teaching, research, outreach, operations, and community life so that we may be a model for how to achieve our moral responsibility. (WHAT) (Current mission statement.)

    Want to become a member?  Want to join us in our mission?

    I think you’ll agree that Model 2 a more convincing endorsement for the NJHEPS.  Alas, it’s not that easy.  Sinek went on to identify a phenomenon he described as “split happens.”  His point was, “as the measurement of WHAT grows, the clarity of the WHY [must stay] closely aligned….The moment at which the clarity of WHY starts to go fuzzy is the split.”  This is critical because, “when people know WHY you do WHAT you do, they are willing to give you credit for everything that could serve as proof of WHY.  When they are unclear about your WHY, WHAT you do has no context.”

    It is my opinion that the NJHEPS needs to recover its WHY.  It has gone “fuzzy.”  WHAT it has been doing is of unclear context.  I am absolutely convinced that it will do precisely that.  In fact, it has already started!  As a result of an invigorated WHY, in the very near future, you’ll receive information about several events that are being planned to help us achieve our moral responsibility.  Member institutions are invited to play prominent roles either in hosting or identifying additional events.

    The late Frank Sinatra, referring to New York City, famously sang, “If I can make there, I’ll make it anywhere.” With all due respect to Mr. Sinatra, when it comes to sustainability, if the moral responsibility of higher education can be achieved in New Jersey, the most densely populated state in the nation, the state with more Superfund sites than any other state in the nation, the state with several top-rated institutions including the number one ranked institution, it can be achieved anywhere.  And the NJHEPS is precisely the organization to lead the way!

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The New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability
     c/o Ramapo College of New Jersey - SSHS
505 Ramapo Valley Rd, Mahwah, NJ 07430
Phone:(201)684-7830 | Fax:(201)684-7932
Email - njheps@gmail.com

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Website last updated: August 14


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